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But renewable energy is free...

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You'll often hear it said that so-called "renewable energy" is free energy. Energy from the sun, from the wind — it's just there for the collection.

But because collection locations are so dispersed, 'cos collection itself not to straightforward — and because the energy density is so low — it takes a lot of stuff to collect all that "free" energy. 

A 2015 estimate by the US Department of Energy showed just how much stuff:

So free energy is not free.

And since mining for all these raw materials would have to increase by >300% to achieve “net zero” goals, which would make that [arbitrary] target date by 2050 impossible. In order for the world to meet Net Zero by 2050 one estimate says the amount of stuff needed would be 4,575,523,674 tons of copper. 940,578,114 tons of Nickel. 8,973,640,257 tons of Graphite, and 4,163,162 tons of Germanium. At todays mining rates that would take over 1000 years. Not to mention the many rare earth metals, which are so-called for good reason.

So it's not so straightforward. And nowhere near so free.

But, in case you didn't notice (it's bar chart being so small down there) it's gas for the win.

[Hat tip Chris Martz]


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gangsterofboats
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How ‘Youth Without Youth’ Led Coppola to ‘Megalopolis’

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Following Francis Ford Coppola’s highly touted “Megalopolis” premiering at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, I’d like to draw attention to my favorite Coppola film and one of his strangest works.

“Youth Without Youth” (2007) is an independently made “art movie” that marked his return to filmmaking after taking a decade-long sabbatical.

Sound familiar?

YouTube Video

Tim Roth stars as Dominic Matei, an elderly professor who is nearing the end of his life. While living in Europe during World War II and struggling to maintain his studies and stature with his staff and students, Matei finds a bizarre redemption in the form of a lightning strike burning him severely.

Once the head-to-toe bandages come off, Matei’s doctor (Bruno Ganz) is stunned to discover that Matei’s body has not only healed but has transformed into a young man.

This surprising development, which is never explained, inspires Matei to go into hiding. The Nazis are searching for scientific anomalies like him.

What is Matei’s drive after finding his youth has returned to him? To finish his life’s study of human language and to reconnect, in a way both spiritual and physical, with the lost love of his life (Alexandra Maria Lara).

“Youth Without Youth” is one of Coppola’s greatest achievements, a deeply personal statement about how it feels to be an old man with the mind of a much younger soul. It is an exploration of how we make plans to be completed over the course of our lives but rarely finish them.

What if, after so many accomplishments, so many friends and family who have passed and the end undoubtedly near, we had a chance to do it all over again? Would we simply live a whole new life or spend time completing the “life’s work” that eluded us the first time?

Where it all leads in the end reminded me of Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” though without Ebenezer Scrooge’s redemption and an ending that is harsher and more honest.

There’s an emotional frankness, a casual attitude towards the mystical and a sad beauty in the storytelling that reminds me of another of my favorite Coppola films, “The Rain People” (1969).

When some filmmakers direct “personal films,” they usually make something off-genre for them; Coppola makes personal films that are an adjustment to witness. He’s showing us something from his subconscious, something from his life that is deeply revealing.

YouTube Video

After the eager anticipation of “Youth Without Youth” was met with a collective shrug, Coppola followed it up with the equally personal, risk taking, strange and sometimes wonderful “Tetro” (2009) and “Twixt” (2011).

There are autobiographical elements in “Youth,” as well as in the intriguing “Tetro” and the wonky but hypnotic “Twixt.”

Now, with the upcoming release of “Megalopolis,” his decades in the planning passion project, the 85-year-old maestro is creating films that will likely challenge those who aren’t familiar with the overall themes and character studies of his work.

For all the theatrical verve and richly imagined action within his films, Coppola’s movies are all character and idea-driven, as well as remorseful and reflective on the past.

FAST FACT: Coppola told the Director’s Guild of America how he approached the film in ways that mirror its content. “I feel as though I’ve made a deliberate choice to reapproach filmmaking with the same attitudes and ignorance that I had as a young person. Obviously, I’m not a kid, but we all have a kid in us and I approached this movie with the willingness to do whatever came into my mind.”

I love Michael Corleone and Col. Kurtz as much as any cinephile, but seeing what Coppola’s dreams look like and watching him work them out in films that resemble an explanation of a lucid memory is a gift. There are moments in “Youth Without Youth” that remind me of the best of Wim Wenders, Akira Kurosawa and David Fincher.

Trying to decipher the exact meaning of everything here is beside the point – ask yourself how it makes you feel, as much as why Coppola wants to explore the origin of human communication in a film that already functions as an awe-inducing, erotic and sensual time-travel fable.

YouTube Video

Some critics deemed the film a mess in 2007, but everything here has a deliberate precision. In fact, “Youth Without Youth” has the same adventurous spirit as David Lynch’s “Inland Empire” (2006), which I saw in theaters at almost the same time.

We need more dreamers making movies.

I’ve taught film classes at the college level for years and wonder if I haven’t already become like Roth’s character – did I peak a decade ago, when my passion for my work was especially obvious, when my students were closer to my age, everything felt new and it seemed I would never stop doing what I love to do?

“Youth Without Youth” appears to be Coppola’s response to whether a man his age can and/or should create art.

The answer, of course, is hell yes.

The post How ‘Youth Without Youth’ Led Coppola to ‘Megalopolis’ appeared first on Hollywood in Toto.

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gangsterofboats
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Jeff Bezos Bought The Washington Post, But The Left Won't Allow Him To Run It

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Here's a bit of useful history. In 1933, the then-bankrupt Washington Post was purchased by the wealthy financier Eugene Meyer. With Meyer’s passing, the paper was inherited by his daughter and son-law, Katherine Meyer Graham and husband Phil Graham. As his wife noted in her memoirs, Phil Graham himself met with tragedy, suffering from manic depression and eventually taking his own life. With that, Kay Graham was on her own - and decidedly made the Washington Post the paper to read when it came to coverage of all things Washington. Famously, along the way, she and Executive Editor Ben Bradlee managed the paper through a series of what liberals perceived as heroic crusades, from the Pentagon Papers to Watergate to Iran-Contra. As a sign of its esteem in media circles, the paper won 18 Pulitzer Prizes, a total that eventually climbed to 73. And then, the golden era, as it were, inevitably ended. In 2013 it was purchased by Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos. Now, in June of 2024, the paper is in trouble. Having staked its flag to being in the anti-Trump media, its circulation has headed south. Which is where Bezos and his picks to run the paper have run into trouble. After the sacking of Executive Editor Sally Buzbee by the Bezos-appointed chief executive William Lewis, CNN reported this:   The Post said that Matt Murray, former editor in chief of The Wall Street Journal, will immediately replace Buzbee as executive editor. Murray will serve in that position through the 2024 presidential election. After the November election, Robert Winnett, deputy editor of The Telegraph Media Group, will take on a new role as editor of The Post, overseeing its core news offering. Murray will then transition to overseeing the formation of a new newsroom at The Post, one which focuses on service and social media journalism. Lewis said the creation of an additional newsroom division represents a “definitive step away from the ‘one size fits all’ approach and moving towards meeting our audiences where they are. Cue the nightmare and staff revolt. This story, written by four Post reporters reported this of an allegation Lewis had been involved in a controversy centered on the theft of a forthcoming copy of the memoirs of ex-British Prime Minister Tony Blair. The Post story reported:  The suspect arrested by London police in 2010 was John Ford, a once-aspiring actor who has since admitted to an extensive career using deception and illegal means to obtain confidential information for Britain’s Sunday Times newspaper. Facing potential prosecution, Ford called a journalist he said he had collaborated with repeatedly — and trusted to come to his rescue. That journalist, according to draft book chapters Ford later wrote recounting his ordeal, was Robert Winnett, a Sunday Times veteran who is set to become editor of the Washington Post later this year. And with that, shortly thereafter journalist Winnett’s potential job at The Post went up in smoke.  Rebellion was afoot in the Post newsroom. Lewis, it was said, “had lost the legitimacy to lead” the paper. There’s more, a lot more. But the bottom line is that with the Bezos takeover and his attempt to bring change to the sinking fortunes of the paper - to save it - open rebellion has broken out with the staff. As noted two weeks ago in this space:  In short, these liberal activists posing as journalists would in fact rather see the paper collapse then start to report stories in a fair and balanced fashion that can be seen as not tilting left. Which is to say, the internals at the Post have, in a mere two weeks, gotten worse. And that in turn means there is one seriously basic fact at the Post.  Jeff Bezos may have purchased the Washington Post. On paper he is the owner. But the left-wing activists who are masquerading as journalists are determined to not allow Bezos to run the paper he owns. Somewhere Eugene Meyer and Katherine Graham, Phil Graham and Ben Bradlee are rolling their eyes and shaking their heads. For the Washington Post, time has moved on.  And not in a good way.
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Let me now teach the British what their culture is

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I posted a comment about British culture, saying that it’s 80% based on Greco-Roman values – in response to a line from Nigel Farage saying “everything in our country and culture is based on Judeo-Christian values.” I got pushback. Even from Britons. So let’s plunge into a spot of cultural anthropology and history: One knows […]
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Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis for Sun, 23 Jun 2024

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Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis on Sun, 23 Jun 2024

Source - Patreon

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Mallard Fillmore by Bruce Tinsley for Thu, 20 Jun 2024

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Mallard Fillmore by Bruce Tinsley on Thu, 20 Jun 2024

Source - Patreon

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